This in another test post

URL: http://freshome.com/

Approx. Subscribers: 64,000+

Main income source: Advertisements, affiliate links?

Let me first say that I love the design of this blog, and it’s a good thing to, as it focuses on design, but not the type you see on the web.

No, Freshome is an absolutely astounding architecture and interior design blog.

One of the writers, Ronique Gibson, revealed on Problogger that she has posted over 773 posts (and that was in 2011!), showing how a “curation” style blog, combined with lengthier posts, can create a real winner if it’s on a focused topic (and the content is top notch).

4. PsyBlog [Social Psychology]
URL: http://www.spring.org.uk/

Approx. Subscribers: 53,000+

Main income source: e-Book sales, advertisements

You can probably guess that this is one of my personal favorites, but it’s easy to see why any reader can enjoy this blog.

The author takes psychology studies that they come across (they happen to be a psychological researcher), and relates them to real world issues and in laymen’s terms, so that anyone can gain the information that they have to offer.

That’s the big emphasis I’d like to make on this blog: you should always be mindful of beginners, it’s not that you have to appeal only to beginners, but taking more complex information and boiling it down into something interesting that anyone can read is a formula for a winner, as long as the audience is there.

5. NerdFitness [Exercise/Physical Fitness]
URL: https://nerdfitness.com/blog/

Approx. Subscribers: 50,000+

Main income source: Product sales

Steve Kamb is a guy well known in the marketing niche, but he doesn’t write about marketing.

That’s because his blog has served as a great example of how to build a successful site full of an endearing personality, outside of the blogging/marketing niche of course.

This is one of the great advantages of being someone knowledgeable in content marketing: you can offer up your success story to all sorts of marketing blogs if you create a popular site in a atypical topic.

Marketing blogs absolutely love case studies of this kind, and you’ll get attention and links just by telling your story. It’s a method Steve has used multiple times to appear on sites like Lifehacker and ThinkTraffic.